Encruzilhada

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmUZRDCzft

Encruzilhada is an interesting low banda, used in Carioca and probably also in Batuque and Bahian Capoeira.

 

The technique uses Snake+Seduction1 mechanics.

The opponent stands with his left side towards your. Start standing by extending your right leg with its back across the fronts of both opponent's legs.

Then start rotating your body leftward until you are facing down; falling foward on both hands.

Keep rotating to the left; crossing your legs; squatting on your left leg, with your right leg across opponent's ankles. It is important the your left shin pressed into the back of opponent's left shin.

Now your legs are crossed, your right leg blocking opponent's right shin from the front, your left leg blocking the back of his left shin.

Finally, jump and spin leftward, drop backward onto both hands and uncross your legs violently; applying lifting power to opponent's left shin and his right ankle simultaneously. This is a high-energy point("Ho!") and exhalation.

This movement applies a nerve disruption (this is a postural nerve disruptor), weakening the opponent and making him fall forward onto his pelvis.

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Encruzilhada is unique between bandas in that the opponent falls forward onto his pelvis; hitting his genitals against the ground. It believe this was the idea.

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Encruzilhada is very nice and 'acrobatic' takedown; but works quite reliably.

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The key is the nerve disruptor; to apply it, you must press opponent's left calf upward with your left calf; as you press into the right-front of his right ankle with your right ankle. However, the force must not be applied directly from his front to his rear! Instead, it must be applied obliquely from his right front.

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The shout "Ho!" is an important part of the technique; without it, it is impossible to throw him by scissoring your legs.

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While Encruzilhada can be done mechanically, as described above, on a high level, it is done with the help of quasiNegaca; the initial spin is done using Bear+Seduction1. This twists his stance and instead of nerve disruption applies a nerve strangle, which makes the final takedown a lot harder.

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There are several efforts to pass Encruzilhada on, for example, in Burlamaqui (1928) or Lamartine Costa's Capoeira sem Mestre book(1962); and in other books too. However, these attempts are failures; they do not even hint at the complex maneuver that is required to apply it.

I want to stress this: Encruzilhada is not just uncrossing your feet, or even spinning horizontally and uncrossing your feet; real Encruzilhada is the complex movement you see above.

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- Encruzilhada is referenced in the article 'Os negros lutam suas lutas misteriosas;Bimba é o grande rei negro do misterioso rito africano' by Ramagem Badaró(1944); about the jogo of Mestre Bimba with 'the Creole'; here, Bimba fakes a Bencao; Creole responds with rasteira (Low bahian rasteira); then, when he sees it was just a trick, tries to turns the low rasteira into Encruzilhada (this can be done very easily); but Bimba grabs him in a front chancery(guillotine choke), defeating him (before the Creole can counter with a Balao arqueado).

- In another article, (Mestre Bimba, Capoeira Champion, Challenges All Bahian Fighters (1936)) Bimba says he learned Encruzilhada from his Mestre Bentinho; but decided not to pass the technique on. The reason might be that when you fail to throw the opponent with Encruzilhada, you are there squatting in the front of the opponent, vulnerable to the front chancery - as noted in previous point.

- Edison Carneiro lists Encruzilhada as one of the techniques of Batuque, where 'the player shoots his legs against the legs of the opponent'.

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- Burlamaqui(1928) shows an escape from Encruzilhada; where your jump out of the takedown, falling into Queda de tres and kicking with the rear leg into opponent's face or chin.

Against true Encruzilhada, you must use LightLegs to be able to apply it; but it still works only against low-level (mechanical) Encruzilhada; it cannot be applied against the quasiNegaca-driven one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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